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British Fascial Symposium 2018

v28 2019 to Prof Olivier Piguet

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 20:36:12

reply kl 13.51 fredag 12-7-2019

Thank you for your message. I am away until 18 July 2019 with limited access to emails during this time.

Please feel free to re-send your email after this date.
Thank you

To Professor Olivier Piguet – The Olfactory Sense
– emailed Fredag 12-7-2019

PROFESSOR OLIVIER PIGUET
https://sydney.edu.au/science/people/olivier.piguet.php
Member of the Brain and Mind Centre
Member of the Charles Perkins Centre
The University of Sydney

Biographical details
Prof Piguet is an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and Professor of Clinical Neuropsychology. He is the co-director of FRONTIER, the frontotemporal dementia clinical research group and the director of the Memory Program of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders.

Good Day Professor Piguet,
I watched you on a Netflix show, “Ask the Doctor”, episode “The Senses”, season 1.

I have reason to believe the sense of smell is diminished in Parkinson’s Disease and other neurological conditions as a result of dysbiosis. Joy Milne can smell Parkinson’s which leads me to believe, like a case of Strep Throat which can be smelled from an over abundance of Streptococcus pyogenes, a dysbiosis exists in PD patients.

An out of balance microbial soup allows an overgrowth of one or more, therefore, a diminished population of another. If the diminished population can be supported or re-established symptoms of the disease (tremors, anosmia, cognitive decline, breathing difficulties) could be managed better. There is a possibility that perhaps the congruence of dysbiosis leads to mis-folding of Beta Amyloid Peptides, Tau Proteins or Alpha-synuclein Protein 1, Could these tangled accumulations NOT exist if dysbiosis were treated?

It is well known drugs interact with body function. Morphine binds to an opiate receptor to have its effect. When the opiate receptor is located on sphincters in the lower digestive system, the sphincters relax and a side effect occurs – constipation.

Nature
ran an article in March 2018 2, how non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals could affect the gut microbiome. The Microbiome is not only in the gut, it is on the skin, in the mouth, in epithelial tissue and in the nasal passages as well. The sense of smell is highly relevant to the communities of microbes within the olfactory system. An early warning sign of PD, is the loss of the sense of smell.

Prevotella
species help the breakdown of protein and carbohydrate foods in the rumen of cattle and sheep. Studies have shown patients with Parkinson’s disease have less bacteria of the Prevotellaceae family in their gut than control subjects 3. Why? We don’t know.

When humans eat flavonoids, this type of polyphenol is beneficial to the human brain and vascular function.4 Before the human body absorbs a flavonoid, intestinal enzymes or colonic microflora MUST hydrolyzed them 5. If the colonic microflora is missing, the health benefits and vascular protections are missing.

The roots of a legume plant secrete flavonoids to help gram negative, motile, non-sporulating rods of diazotrophic bacteria known as Rhizobia have a symbiotic relationship and fix nitrogen for the plant to have in a usable form. 6

Is there a possibility, the Nitric Oxide, humans need is regulated by a microorganism like in the legume plant? Perhaps the lack of this microbe in humans stiffens not only the blood vessels but the human fascial system, whereby making neurotransmission and neuromodulation inept. Cycling, Boxing, Singing and Dancing all promote more Nitric Oxide production in vivo.
If I were a protein, overtime, I would mis-fold and mis-behave, under these circumstances, without the proper balance of microbes.

I leave you with excerpts from an article written by Miro Mannino. There have been many whom have written about the Island of Guam and lytico-bodig disease like Oliver Sacks.

All my best for your research. Hope you can used some of mine.
Allissa Harter from Iowa, Living in Sweden

Long studied, now disappearing disease (excerpts only)
https://www.guampedia.com/lytico-bodig-on-guam/
by Miro Mannino

Lytico-bodig is the local name for a complex of neurological diseases (or diseases that affect the nervous system) on Guam that resembles amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gerhig’s disease), Parkinsonism-Dementia (PD) and possibly Alzheimer’s disease.

Although lytico-bodig are worded together, they actually represent two different diseases. The term “lytico” comes from the Spanish word paralytico which means weakness. “Bodig” comes from the Spanish word bodega, or warehouse. Lytico patients have ALS symptoms, while patients with Bodig have symptoms that resemble PD.

Because of its occurrence in a relatively unique and isolated population, lytico-bodig has been widely studied by various groups of researchers in the hopes of finding its cause and possible cures.

Now known formally as ALS-PD complex of Guam (ALS-PDC), its prevalence in the 1950s and 1960s brought a sense of immediacy to working on Guam as patients passed away from the disease. The major research efforts sought to answer the question of whether lytico-bodig is a genetic or hereditary disease, or one caused by some environmental factor or factors? Although numerous theories were brought forward, there is still no definitive set of causes or cures. With advances in medical technology, strides have been made toward understanding lytico-bodig clinically, however, only few have studied its social or cultural impact on the Chamorro people. Although reports of neurological disease resembling lytico-bodig among the Chamorros occurred as far back as the early 1800s, formal study of the disease would not take place until more than a century later.

At its peak in the 1950s, lytico-bodig became the leading cause of death for Chamorros, affecting some 420 per 100,000 Chamorros, at a ratio of 2:1 males to females. ALS was seen more in Chamorros, while PD was seen in both Chamorro and Filipino natives. According to Chris Plato, et al., the incidence of ALS peaked from 1950-1954 in both males and females, but by the late 1950s, the incidence of ALS began to decline. Also, the incidence of PDC in males peaked from 1960 to 1964, and then declined steadily until 1980. The incidence of PDC in females peaked in 1970 to 1974, then rapidly declined in the early 1980s.

Another symptom which seems to be associated with ALS/PDC is linear retinal epitheliopathy, which is a disorder of the eye. The retinal epithelium is the pigmented layer of the retina at the back of the eye that anchors photoreceptors, or the cells that sense light and help with vision. There are no symptoms except for unusual tracks that appear in the retinal layer, but it seems to appear in half of Guamanian Chamorros with ALS and PDC and to precede the onset of the disease.

Cycads (fadang)
Probably the most well-known proposed cause of lytico-bodig involves neurotoxins in cycad seeds. In the 1960s, early researchers Leonard Kurland and Donald Mulder postulated that poisons in cycad seeds, ingested over time, possibly caused the disease on Guam. Unlike other Pacific islands, the Chamorros on Guam would leech the seeds of the false sago palm (Cycas micronesica, or fadang in Chamorro) to remove the poisons and then ground them into flour for baking.

In the early 2000s, the cycad toxin theory was brought up again with Paul Cox and Oliver Sacks who observed a decline in lytico-bodig that paralleled a decline in the fruit bat population on Guam. They proposed that while cycad processed into flour was not toxic enough to produce lytico-bodig, there may be other elements in the Chamorro diet that could magnify the effects of the neurotoxin. Eating fruit bat (Pteopus ariannusmariannus, or fanihi in Chamorro), for example, a local delicacy, might contribute to the possibility of the disease. The scientists suggested that fruit bats that eat the cycad accumulate the toxins in their tissues but may not themselves be affected by the toxins.

However, if people ate enough of the fruit bats over the course of their lifetime (perhaps beginning in childhood), the toxins could accumulate in their bodies and eventually cause the disease. Cox also suggested that the presence of cyanobacteria in cycads which could produce BMAA naturally, may also be considered a possible cause. Cox and his colleagues also reported that BMAA was found in ALS and PD patients on Guam.


RESOURCES 1-6:

1) https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/SNCA
It is unclear how alterations in the SNCA gene cause Parkinson disease. This condition involves the selective death or impairment of neurons that produce dopamine. Misfolded or excess alpha-synuclein proteins may cluster together to form Lewy bodies and impair the function of these neurons in specific regions of the brain. Lewy bodies may disrupt the regulation of dopamine, which allows dopamine to accumulate to toxic levels and eventually kill neurons.

2) Nature volume 555, pages 623–628 (29 March 2018)
“Extensive impact of non-antibiotic drugs on human gut bacteria”
Lisa Maier, Mihaela Pruteanu, Michael Kuhn, Georg Zeller, Anja Telzerow, Exene Erin Anderson, Ana Rita Brochado, Keith Conrad Fernandez, Hitomi Dose, Hirotada Mori, Kiran Raosaheb Patil, Peer Bork & Athanasios Typas

3) Pa­tients with Par­kin­son’s dis­ease have clear changes in their gut mi­cro­bi­ota
25.3.2019
https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/life-science-news/patients-with-parkinsons-disease-have-clear-changes-in-their-gut-microbiota

A study carried out at the University of Helsinki indicates that microbes in the gut and mouth could provide new perspectives on the onset of Parkinson’s disease, particularly as they have long been suspected to play a part in the disease process.

Recently, microbial inhabitants of the human body have been connected to several health problems, including Parkinson’s disease and other neurological diseases.

In her doctoral dissertation, Velma Aho investigated the potential associations of Parkinson’s disease and human microbiota in the mouth, nose and gut, and examined the tools used to compare their abundance. Aho’s findings supported an observation according to which patients with Parkinson’s disease have less bacteria of the Prevotellaceae family in their gut than control subjects.

Prevotella
species are among the most numerous microbes culturable from the rumen and hind gut of cattle and sheep, where they help the breakdown of protein and carbohydrate foods.

my Letter to Velma Aho. She answered April 17, 2019
“I must admit I don’t know anything at all about the relationship of Prevotellaceae and nitric oxide. I have primarily focused on gut microbiota analyses, and a quick literature search of Prevotella and NO seems to mainly give hits related to oral microbiota. The oral species and strains tend to be different from the ones in the gut, so it’s difficult to know how similar their metabolism etc would be. Overall, what the gut Prevotella species are actually doing seems quite unclear to me based on the literature I’ve found so far, so there’s a lot of research to be done regarding that. But I think I will try to look more into the Prevotella and NO literature in the future, since this is something I haven’t read about at all. So, unfortunately I don’t really have an answer for you, but it’s an interesting question, so thank you again!”

4) Professor Jeremy Spencer
https://www.reading.ac.uk/food/about/staff/j-p-e-spencer.aspx

A major output from the group has been to help define the paradigm-changing concept of how flavonoids and other polyphenols act via non-antioxidant mechanisms of action in vivo to mediate bphysiologically/clinically significant benefits on human brain and vascular function. His group have defined how a number of flavonoids/polyphenols and their metabolites exert specific interactions within ERK and PI3 kinase/Akt signalling pathways, leading to increases in the expression of neuroprotective and neuromodulatory proteins and an increase in the number of, and strength of, connections between neurons. Furthermore, they have detailed effects on the vascular system, which may lead to enhancements in cognitive performance through increased brain blood flow and an ability to initiate neurogenesis in the hippocampus.

5) Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2009 Nov-Dec; 2(5): 270–278.
doi: 10.4161/oxim.2.5.9498
PMCID: PMC2835915
PMID: 20716914
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835915/

Plant polyphenols as dietary antioxidants in human health and disease
Kanti Bhooshan Pandey and Syed Ibrahim Rizvi
Department of Biochemistry; University of Allahabad; Allahabad, India
Corresponding author.
Correspondence to: Syed Ibrahim Rizvi; Email: moc.liamg@ivziris

6) Wikipedia….https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diazotroph
Diazotrophs are bacteria and archaea that fix atmospheric nitrogen gas into a more usable form such as ammonia. Cyanobacteria—there are also symbiotic cyanobacteria. Some associate with fungi as lichens, with liverworts, with a fern, and with a cycad.[8]



V26 2019 Joanne Avison / John Sharkey

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 20:24:26

v26 ons den 26 juni 2019 kl 12.31

Dear Joanne Avison and John Sharkey,
I have been listening to you since the NTC symposium prior to the 2016 BFS. From chocolate to bones which float, your ideas have been bending my ideas.

I would like to take the Fascia Tensegrity Course starting in September 2019. I would appreciate your help to dive into a subject more, “The Placebo Effect” per John Sharkey’s brilliant segway about the Ligament of Berry in the throat causing an “embarrassment of the heart”.

I watched Michael Mosley’s Placebo Experiment on Swedish television. Fascia may hold more of a key as to the HOW Dr. Andrew Carr’s shoulder placebo experiment had a positive effect on the “real” and “placebo” shoulder operations.

Also, and excellent study In 1959, Dr. Leonard Cobb reduced Angina Pectoralis with a sham surgery. It was thought at the time, chest pain was reduced by real surgery, ligation of the internal mammary artery. The real surgery was thought to increase coronary artery blood flow; therefore, reducing pain. Dr Cobb proved with his sham surgery, the reduction in pain was NOT due to ligation of the internal mammary artery. Chest pain reduction in his patients was called the Placebo Effect.

Mr. Sharkey and Ms Avison —- could be fascia responsible for this???

Is the Placebo Effect accurate? Could Fascia play a role? At the time in 1959, the rich sensory organ of fascia was discarded as an inert packing material. Only recently, with new technologies, have the advantages of the this connective tissue coming to the forefront of science.

The Placebo Effect was proven in Dr. Leonard Cobb’s Heart Ligation study. But given recent research into fascia, this must be reviewed. Also, Dr. Michael Mosley’s television program, “The Placebo Effect”, where the surgical intervention was just as effect as the sham surgery.

The Placebo Experiment: Can My Brain Cure My Body?
2018 Episode 8 of 15
Dr Michael Mosley attempts to cure real pain with fake pills in Britain’s largest ever trial to investigate the placebo effect. He also tries to experience it for himself.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bmblb8

All my best,
Allissa from Iowa, Living in Sweden

PROFILE OF PROFESSOR ANDREW CARR
Andrew CarrChM DSc FRCS FMedSci
https://www.ndorms.ox.ac.uk/team/andrew-carr

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT
▪ Nuffield Professor of Orthopaedics
▪ Director of the Musculoskeletal BRC Theme
▪ Director of the Botnar Research Centre

Andy Carr is the Nuffield Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Oxford. He is an inter-disciplinary researcher distinguished for evaluating and developing surgical implants and technologies and for his leadership in surgical and musculoskeletal research.



v25 2019 – Astronauts

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 20:19:29

v25 söndag 23 juni 2019 kl 9.12 – matthew.cox@military.com
v25 söndag 23 juni 2019 kl 9.05 – sheryl.E.Baca@nasa.gov

A similar letter was also sent to NASA Astronaut contact: Sheryl Baca for Kate Rubins and Stephanie Wilson

Dear Mr Matthew Cox,
I read your article June 21, 2019 on Lt Col Anne McClain. She will return to Earth soon, so this email is relevant to her. I address her colleagues Kate Rubins and Stephanie Wilson as well per their education in microbiology and engineering.

Per your article, you wrote Lt.Col McClain worked on the following: “human immune-system response and antibody production and protein crystal formations to provide insight into Parkinson’s disease, the release states.” The human Fascial System has everything to do with Parkinson’s and the immune system, so my email is relevant to her work.

Would you be so kind as to help me get this email to Lt Col McClain? Please.
Thank you,

Allissa

Dear Awesome Astronauts Lt Col Anne McClain, Kate Rubins and Stephanie Wilson:
I am writing both of you because of your space travel experience and education in Immune System and PD, microbiology and flexible structures in space, respectively.

I am not sure of your interest in what I am about to say, but my interest is high. Therefore, I am inclined to get your thoughts/input?

Dr Karen Lloyd was on the TED stage discussing the complex criss-cross structures underneath our feet. “Tiny little fractures and empty spaces….filled with astronomical quantities of microbes.” Dr Lloyd runs Lloyd Lab (deep subsurface biosphere research) in the Department of Microbiology at the University of Tennessee.

This subsurface of Earth resembles our human body subsurface. This is what I want to introduce you to: fascia. I believe there is a way to help your bodies recover from space flight and microgravity.

The Fascial System of the human body has not been in textbooks as a System, but it is gaining traction. More scientists are researching the Interstitium and technologies are improving to view inside the living body at smaller scales.

As the human body comes back to Earth, it undergoes profound aging (eyes, muscles, bone) and neurological shifts. Perception of balance and coordination “in gravity” takes time to acclimate to after microgravity, despite a rigorous exercise routine.

Exercise helps to restore large scale hydration, electrolyte balance and health, but what about the smallest of the small criss-crosses of our sub-surface? Without gravity and pressure drive forces, fluid does not flow well. Minimal pressure driven forces cannot hydrate “Tiny little fractures and empty spaces….filled with astronomical quantities of microbes.”

Exercise helps but it is not the whole story. Mechanotransduction (compression, push/pull – coined from Donald Ingber) influences cell behavior, the telocytes and integrins necessary for communication at the smallest cell level.

The microbes within us also need mechanical forces in our tiniest of tiny spaces so communication (Quorum Sensing) may occur.

I see profound aging in my clients who are not old. Their body either has pain, their mind has brain fog, or their coordination is poor – not because of trauma. With loading and unloading tissues, their body regains suppleness (less stiff) due to the hydration of microvacuoles within the Fascial System.

We are a Biotensegrity structure. When under duress, the structure cannot find the center of gravity. Pressure driven forces cannot move fluid efficiently. Balance and coordination are no longer automatic, they have to be constantly considered in every movement. This is exhausting.

If you have time, or an interest, I encourage your next pre/post space flight to utilize Sue Hitzmann’s MELT Method along with the prescribed rigorous exercise regime in space.

Your colleague Anne McClain-whom is set to return Monday 6/24/2019-may find the MELT Method helps her body to reconnect to the mind and function as a unit, more profoundly and faster than without using the MELT Method.

If you are interested in being in contact with Sue Hitzmann directly. I will put you in contact with her right hand lady, Jaci Dygos.

Other resources regarding fascia and tensengrity models, since you both are grounded in science, are below.

Thank you to you all for being incredibly positive role models for my 12 year old daughter. She wants to study astronomy in Sweden.

Safe travels in the future to you both,
All my Best,
Allissa from Iowa, Living in Sweden.

Fascia Research Society
https://fasciaresearchsociety.org/

Dr Melody Swartz
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0962892406003291
Trends in Cell Biology
Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2007, Pages 44-50
“A driving force for change: interstitial flow as a morphoregulator”

Dr Neil Theise – Liver pathologist
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/meet-your-interstitium-a-newfound-organ/
https://www.scientificamerican.com/the-body/
Meet Your Interstitium, a Newfound “Organ”
These fluid-filled spaces were found in the body’s connective tissue
By Rachael Rettner, LiveScience on March 27, 2018

Dr. Carla Stecco- Italian orthopedic surgeon, research and author.
Dr. Carla Stecco has become an amazing force with her pioneering work in the cadaver lab. She has provided the realization of fascia no longer being discarded as refuse by the anatomist. Her book published 2015, Functional Atlas of the Human Fascial System, tells how the human body’s fascial system interplays with muscle, ligaments, and tendons as well as functions as an organ of sensory perception.

Excerpt from page 6 of her book, “Fibroblasts are the principal cell of the CT (connective tissue).” Fibroblasts main function is to maintain structural integrity of CT. They do this by secreting collagen, elastin, and complex carbohydrates of the ground substance into the Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM). Fibroblasts have a role in remodeling the matrix by degrading and synthesizing new fibers and proteins. “Fibroblastic proliferation and degradation is a normal occurrence in everyday mechanical loading such as walking, running, and most forms of movement. Collagen synthesis in the patellar tendon increases by nearly 100% as a result of just a single bout of acute exercise, and the effect is still evident 3 days later.”

Prof Dr. Carla Stecco spoke at the 5th Fascia Research Congress in Berlin, Germany November 2018 regarding a new receptor recently found, Endocannabinoid Receptor (CB2) in living tissue. This is found only in the fat cells of the subcutaneous and superficial fascia (not the deep layers of fascia). This receptor gives credence to soft tissue massage, as the receptor can stimulate the endorphin system.



v24 2019 to/from Doug Nelson

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 18:26:57

replied email from Doug Nelson-
v24 sön den 16 juni 2019 kl 17.57

Hi Allissa,
Germany was wonderful, as was Denmark where we visited an exchange student and her family. I feel at home in the Nordic countries (no surprise there. . .)

May I publish your blood sugar case report on this page?
https://www.nmtmidwest.com/case-reports

Doug

email written to Doug Nelson-
v24 lör den 15 juni 2019 kl 11.04

Doug,
I always find when I have certain quandaries about my massage practice, I go back to PNMT classes and what I learned from you.

I saw recently you and Janet were in Germany. Were you able to check out the FASCIA exhibit from Gunther von Hagen’s Plastinarium in Berlin? https://fasciaresearchsociety.org/plastination

I listened to the Naked Scientists, Naked Neuroscience Podcast March 20, 2019 – “Uncovering Consciousness”. It made me know why I pursued a Blood Sugar Study when I was a massage therapist in Des Moines, Iowa. I thank you for being a wonderful guide and nurturing ideas.

All my Best
Allissa from Iowa, Living in Sweden 🙂

The elastic behind light bulb moments
with Leonard Mlodinow

“Human thinking can be put on a spectrum and at one end is logical, analytical, rational thought, that’s conscious thinking…..And at the other end of the thinking spectrum is elastic thinking, and that’s where that comes from. Elastic thinking isn’t about following rules it’s about making up the rules that you’ll follow later when you use the analytical thinking. It’s about how you see a situation, figure out what to ask about it and it’s about how you adapt and approach a novel situation or challenge.” by Leonard Mlodinow

Using Elastic Thinking in a small Blood Sugar Study
– alterations thru Massage Therapy albeit food intake

Feb 2014 – Sept 2014

I am not a scientist, but a massage therapist with a curious mind. It was often in Precision Neuromuscular Therapy continuing education classes in which instructor, Doug Nelson, would say, “We did a study on that.” There were data points on Adductor Magnus massage increasing ROM of hamstring length and flexibility benefits. There were data points on forward flexion increasing with simple massage therapy interventions. It was astounding to me, he and his office, and several other curious therapist embarked on case studies and research themselves.

When a client of mine (MCK1954) developed a condition of Type II Diabetes after years of healthy eating. He and I asked a lot of questions: Why? How?

MCK1954 should not have been on the diabetic chart given his lifestyle. An avid cyclist with his wife, he took the bus downtown to work so he could close his eyes and mediate, or look at other people and create stories of where they came from. His children often shunned the idea of having friends over for dinner, due to the menu and questions like, “What on earth are we eating?” Buckwheat pancakes with blueberry compote were often on the breakfast menu. Wheat grass shots were the first “go to” at the weekly Farmer’s Market outing on Saturday mornings.

Yet, MCK1954, was a career man with a stressful job at a large corporation.

Many health professionals told MCK1954 that his blood sugar was exclusively linked to diet. But he and I wondered if that was a medical myth. It did not make sense given his lifestyle.

Every time MCK1954 went home after massage, despite what he ate pre or post massage, his blood sugar had the most remarkable decrease. Could massage be helping MCK1954’s chronically high blood sugar levels to lower?

So MCK1954 and I did research “N of ONE”. Then more massage clients jumped on board.

METHOD:
An over the counter blood sugar testing device was found to calibrate well with MCK1954’s home blood sugar device. It was the standard monitoring device used throughout the study.

35 clients agreed to participate in the blood sugar test / massage experiment from Feb 2014-Sept 2014 and one sample taken June 2015.

Blood sugar was measured in 35 participants before their massage and directly after their massage, despite what they ate prior to massage. Three or more blood sugar levels pre and post massage were successfully measured in 33 participants. (#31 FJHalf1976 her last post measurement was taken June 2015, but the reading is on the Blood Sugar monitoring device. The device was moved to Sweden and it is in a box somewhere).

Results:
Values have not been statistically analyzed. But it is interesting how many people had a drop in blood sugar after massage, except the following outliers:

The case of #22 FHS1973, her 2nd testing. Her blood sugar was higher post massage than pre massage. Out of 3 samples taken, this was abnormal from her first and third sample. In the second sample, she had apprehension of going to a dentist appointment directly following the massage.

#3 MRP1961, 3rd sample out of 4 samples. Normally, he demonstrated a large decrease in blood sugar levels pre and post massage, except for the 3rd sample. MRP1961 was going on vacation directly after our massage. Upon arriving, he proudly boasted “I am not even taking the laptop on vacation!”.

I had a client with an opposite reaction.
#13 MJR1946 had consistent blood sugar levels and #1, #2, #3 samples. It was out of interest to test him on #4 pre and post massage. During the massage, I knew I would tell him I would be moving to Sweden in the very immediate future. His blood sugar raised on the 4th sample post massage.

Conclusion:
I understand this is not the most rigorous experiment on Blood Sugar and Massage. Many individuals told me I needed to measure blood sugar after fasting. Although, there are reasons for this, my reason for the experiment was to conclude: Could Massage Therapy allow the body to balance systems on its own?

The results speak for themselves and they are interesting.

It has been difficult to find someone whom could help crunch the numbers. I have contacted Universities and other scientists, alas no statistical data from the 35 participants has been calculated.

It is my conclusion, massage therapy does free the body to help homeostasis in most individuals with stressful lives.

In a Promotional advertisement from Abbott Labs*, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the FreeStyle® Libre for the 30.3 million Americans who have diabetes is the tip of the iceberg of monitoring fluid systems in the body. This measuring device monitors fluids in the periphery. My conclusion is massage therapy alters these fluid systems in the periphery, thus, helps to promote homeostasis throughout the body.

It is my conclusion, although diet may play a role in blood sugar levels, decreasing perceived stress thru massage therapy offers more health benefits than only diet control. Since this mini blood sugar study was completed, I have read information from Dr. Rangan Chatterjee (UK medical doctor), Alessandro Ferretti* nutritionist and researcher, and Dr. Brent A. Bauer* from Mayo Clinic USA all to point to the fact stress plays a significant a role in diabetes.

A PDF is included to see the 35 participants data.

Thank you for reading my Elastic Thinking Blood Sugar Study.
Allissa Harter from Iowa, Living in Sweden

* Visit
https://www.freestylelibre.us
The FreeStyle Libre system measures glucose levels through a small sensor — the size of two stacked quarters —applied to the back of your upper arm. It provides real-time glucose readings for up to 10 days, both day and night. The sensor can also read glucose levels through clothes, making testing discreet and convenient.

Studies show that FreeStyle Libre users who scan more frequently spend less time in hypoglycemia and experience improved average glucose levels. According to a study published in The Lancet, people using the FreeStyle Libre system spent 38 percent less time within hypoglycemia as compared with those who managed their glucose with traditional self monitoring glucose system.

Diabetes doesn’t have to control your life. It’s time to live freely.

* Alessandro Ferretti, nutritionist and researcher, who has spent years researching the effects of various stressors on the body by meticulously monitoring the heart rate variability (HRV) and blood sugar levels of both his clients and himself. He shares the fascinating findings of his research and explains that what causes stress on our bodies can be different for different individuals – one man’s medicine really can be another man’s poison – and the way we perceive an event is key. We also discuss the effect of shift work on our bodies, how type 2 diabetes is not just a dietary problem, how the wrong timing of meals can act as a significant stressor on the body and the impact of caffeine and insufficient sleep.

by Dr. Rangan Chatterjee / April 24, 2019
https://drchatterjee.com/personalising-your-health-with-alessandro-ferretti/

* 2016 INTERNATIONAL MASSAGE THERAPY RESEARCH CONFERENCE
KEYNOTE SPEAKER:
Brent A. Bauer, MD – Mayo Clinic
Massage Therapy at Mayo Clinic: Research Transforming Practice

AMTA presents IMTRC 2016
http://massagetherapyfoundation.org/massage-research/research-conferences/2016-international-massage-therapy-research-conference/2016-international-massage-therapy-research-conference-keynote-speakers/



v15v16 2019 Velma Aho

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 18:04:37

2nd letter from me: Ons 24/4/2019
Velma,
I am happy for you. The whole experience is roller coaster. Whew, you made it! Good for you!

Thank you for responding. I appreciate that.

I am interested in fascia. I understand the endothetial tissue of the blood vessels release the gas Nitric Oxide naturally. When flavonoids are introduced, the production of NO is higher. Because fascia has contractile properties (myofibroblasts) like the smooth muscle of blood vessels, this makes me wonder about increased Nitric Oxide for Parkinson’s patients.

I appreciate your willingness to be curious. I hope the following link to Professor Spencer’s lab in the UK interests you as well.

Thank you from Sweden.
Allissa 🙂

https://www.reading.ac.uk/food/about/staff/j-p-e-spencer.aspx
Name: Professor Jeremy Spencer

A major output from the group has been to help define the paradigm-changing concept of how flavonoids and other polyphenols act via non-antioxidant mechanisms of action in vivo to mediate physiologically/clinically significant benefits on human brain and vascular function. His group have defined how a number of flavonoids/polyphenols and their metabolites exert specific interactions within ERK and PI3 kinase/Akt signalling pathways, leading to increases in the expression of neuroprotective and neuromodulatory proteins and an increase in the number of, and strength of, connections between neurons. Furthermore, they have detailed effects on the vascular system, which may lead to enhancements in cognitive performance through increased brain blood flow and an ability to initiate neurogenesis in the hippocampus.

Answered: April 17, 2019
Hello Allissa,
And thank you for your email. The defence went well – I passed (still waiting to get the diploma through all the bureaucracy), and it was a fascinating scientific discussion overall, just like your question!

I must admit I don’t know anything at all about the relationship of Prevotellaceae and nitric oxide. I have primarily focused on gut microbiota analyses, and a quick literature search of Prevotella and NO seems to mainly give hits related to oral microbiota. The oral species and strains tend to be different from the ones in the gut, so it’s difficult to know how similar their metabolism etc would be. Overall, what the gut Prevotella species are actually doing seems quite unclear to me based on the literature I’ve found so far, so there’s a lot of research to be done regarding that. But I think I will try to look more into the Prevotella and NO literature in the future, since this is something I haven’t read about at all. So, unfortunately I don’t really have an answer for you, but it’s an interesting question, so thank you again!

Best regards,
Velma

———-
Velma T. E. Aho, MSc, BA, Doctoral student
DNA sequencing and genomics lab
Institute of Biotechnology
P.O. Box 56 (Viikinkaari 5)
00014 University of Helsinki
Finland

1st email: April 11, 2019
Ms Velma Aho,

I understand from the University of Helsinki website you are in the doctoral program and recently defended your dissertation. I hope it went well for you.

Could you help me? I am curious, is there is a relationship between the Prevotellaceae family and in vivo production of Nitric Oxide?

Many thank yous,
Allissa living in Sweden

Resources
1) Pa­tients with Par­kin­son’s dis­ease have clear changes in their gut mi­cro­bi­ota
25.3.2019
https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/life-science-news/patients-with-parkinsons-disease-have-clear-changes-in-their-gut-microbiota

2) http://www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/en/gut-microbiota-in-parkinsons-disease
27 DEC 2014 Filip Scheperjans



v13v14 2019 Rusty Gage Jonas Frisén

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 17:45:36

my reply to Jonas: April 9, 2019

Tyvärr. Jag är tacksam att du skrev mig tillbaka.
I appreciate you taking time to write me back. Thank you.
Allissa

Answer from Jonas Frisén – Karolinski Institute April 7, 2019
Hej Allissa,
Thank you for your mail and apologies for my slow correspondence.
I am afraid that this is a little far from my research topic and I am not aware of anyone pursuing the research topic you are interested in.

Best wishes,
Jonas

question: March 26, 2019
To: Rusty Gage, The Salk Institute & Jonas Frisén, Karolinski Institute

Hej Hej Jonas,
Dear Professor Rusty Gage,

I read about you in an article from Scientific American regarding neurogenesis.

Dr Carla Stecco had to take tissue samples from surgery biopsies to find new fasciacytes. My question to you is related to fascia and the brain in the living model. There is more science data on this membrane / connective tissue and its role in communication with the brain for proprioception, touch, and interoception. These senses are heightened in the parasympathetic state. The lack of information from the above senses results in brain disease processes, possibly neuron apoptosis. A “use it or lose it” mantra.

As a Bodyworker, massage therapy, I have the opportunity to work with the body in a drug free manner. The pre and post effects of bodywork for chronic pain sufferers, those with PTSD, or movement disorders is beneficial, yet short lived.

I would be interested in knowing how massage affects the brain with two photo microscopy used in Maiken Nedergaard’s lab to discover the Glymphatic System.

Do you know someone interested in following this path of research?

Thank you.
Allissa Harter from Iowa, Living in Sweden.

= = = = = = = = = =

Resources:
Introduction – Rusty Gage, The Salk Institute
Published on May 23, 2017
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-J5wPFUo_iA

Proving causality in the gut brain axis
Sarkis Mazmanian, Caltech
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owj2gkomv2s
Published on May 24, 2017

KEYNOTE: Proving causality in the gut brain axis using human to mouse bacterial transplant- Sarkis Mazmanian, Caltech

The Gut-Brain Axis: Who’s in Charge?
May 3, 2017
Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine – Roth Auditorium

With the Brain and the Microbiome national initiatives well underway, the time is ripe to explore the important intersection between them. Thanks to support from the Kavli Foundation, we are able to host this symposium to help define a joint Microbiome-Brain Initiative. The goal of this symposium is to bring together the Microbiome and Neuroscience sectors in hopes of bridging the Gut-Brain Axis.

Sponsored by the Kavli Foundation and The Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind



v6 2019 to/from Gerald Pollack

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 16:46:33

from Dr. Pollack –
10 February 2019 @ kl 23.59
Hi Allissa,
Wow! So much information to digest. I’m afraid my answers might not satisfy.

Regarding your first bullet, I can say “yes.” Our studies have shown that both bubbles and droplets are enveloped by EZ shells. So, I would hazard a guess that any bubbles/droplets you see, either inside or outside the cell, contain these shells. The structure of these shells is described in detail in my recent book. Not sure you’ve seen “The Fourth Phase of Water” but it’s become popular. Whether is participates in tensegrity is another issue – the structure seems to differ from the icosahedron you mention – we see it as a hexagonal lattice, as argued in the above-mentioned book.

Regarding the second bullet, once again, we see the structure as layered, just like the structure around the bubble/droplet. My understanding is that the fascia consists mostly of connective tissue, but likely SURROUNDED by EZ water. On the other hand, the mechanical properties would appear to be some combination of the mechanical properties of the connective tissue AND the enveloping EZ water.

Hope that helps…. maybe a little?

Best,
Jerry

to Dr. Pollack –
10 February 2019 @ kl18.51

https://www.pollacklab.org
Gerald H. Pollack, PhD
Professor of Bioengineering – Box 355061
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
ghp@u.washington.edu

What is within and around a vacuole, space, little droplet? This is the reason I am writing to you, Dr. Pollack. You have a team behind you. And a curious mind.

Can you help me figure out the puzzle of HOW life fits together based on the foundation = the 4th Phase of Water?

Based on your speech at, EU2017: Future Science @29:51 “The dots or little droplets or little bubbles are the structure, lined by EZ material like an onion skin.”

• The structure of “little droplets or little bubbles” are the icosahedrons which provide biotensegrity

• “EZ material like onion skin” is the fascia which is a biofilm created by bacteria.

I write this based on the following information.

According to Bonnie Bassler at Princeton’s Bassler Labs, “bacteria build biofilms.” Her lab works on how bacteria communicate and how they control collective behaviors.

A physicist joined Bassler Labs in 2013, Knut Drescher, “I don’t know anything about biology but I know physics.” He studied a fluid flow dynamics.

How physics plays out in biology? Knut said, “One must move away from working in a flask, and mimic the world of the bacterium” @ 28:20…and that is a biofilm. He said, “The world works under pressure driven flow. It is more about curves than flat surfaces. Everything has curves, only in the lab, samples are grown in flat surfaces.”

The space within trabeculae of bone teams with its own ecosystem. Perhaps this is a form of biofilm. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trabecula

When crossing fluid-filled spaces, trabeculae may have the function of resisting tension (as in the penis, see for example trabeculae of corpora cavernosa and trabeculae of corpus spongiosum) or providing a cell filter (as in the trabecular meshwork of the eye).

A trabecula (plural trabeculae, from Latin for “small beam”) is a small, often microscopic, tissue element in the form of a small beam, strut or rod that supports or anchors a framework of parts within a body or organ.[1][2] A trabecula generally has a mechanical function, and is usually composed of dense collagenous tissue (such as the trabecula of the spleen). They can be composed of other materials such as muscle and bone.

Bone bleaching is, like the bleaching of Coral Reefs, called osteoporosis. Life is all around, but the bacterial biofilm cannot stick where it needs to stick. Bacterial life cannot exist for long in two and three dimensions without a biofilm. Therefore, there is loss of life. The bone dies and becomes brittle, despite the activity surrounding it.

Treat a bone with hydrochloric acid (Ca PO4)(OH2). The acid digests the mineral scaffolding aka biotensegrity structure. The collagen protein remains. Without the minerals, the bone is bendy, rubbery.

Treat a bone with bleach (hypochlorite). The bleach digests the collagen protein. The mineral scaffolding, the tensegrity structure, is left over. Without the collagen, the bone is brittle.

Could collagen actually be a microbial fiber? Currently it is thought to be inert, but at one time Schwann Cells were considered inert peripheral glial cells.

Science is full of Oops moments. R. Douglas Fields changed the “Thinking of the Day” in one experiment. (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-other-half-of-the-bra/) R. Douglas Fields, a researcher at the National Institute of Health in the USA, proved in an experiment Schwann cells attach to long axons and form myelin around nerves. The “Thinking of the Day” was: Schwann cells were inert like the plastic coat around a wire cannot feel the electricity within the wire. Fields was imaging cultures and decided to put in Schwann Cells. Low and behold, the calcium change was detected in the surrounding neurons.

Ignaz Semmelweis in the mid 1800s asked his students to wash with chloride of lime (calcium hypochlorite) before they examined women in the hospital. The death rate from child bed fever aka sepsis declined. Bleach kills pathogenic bacteria. This good if the tissue has pathogenic sepsis. Possibly, bad if it kills commensal tissue bacteria as well.

Egyptian mummies’ bones have been found to contain a molecule safe to animal tissue, an antibiotic, tetracycline. Egyptians often drank beer bread. The process of fermenting the beer with bread, gave the beer an elixir of life quality. Basically, a low grade antibiotic which solved a lot of infectious problems at the time. The Scottish chemist Sir Alexander Fleming found something similar in 1921 a bacteriolytic substance, a lysozyme. Then in 1928, he serendipitously found an antibiotic, a mould, called penicillin.

Your information about Bound Water, Liquid Crystal Water, 4th Phase of Water, is thrilling, especially for Body Workers. This hydrophilic water reminds me of the fluid surrounding fascia and the proteoglycans of the ECM. It is the fluid within the scaffolding which contains nano microbial life. The Exclusion Zone, a vacuole? a biofilm?, “The dots or little droplets or little bubbles are the structure, lined by EZ material like an onion skin.”

Dr. Jean-Claude Guimberteau, The french hand surgeon which gave the world intimate views of the body, “Strolling Under the Skin”, said the space is called a vacuole. The vacuole is critical. The dew like fluid around it, holds up the pyramid, cell, icosahedron, per Dr Tom O’Byran Interconnected Series 9 Dec 2018.

Dr. George Tetz and others have done research on small life forms called bacteriophages. Bacteriophages are a type of virus that can infect bacteria and alter their function. First identified in 1917 by the former Soviet Union in their quest for something like an antibiotic.

Dr. George Tetz on Episode 77 of the Empowering Neurologist:
“So as for now, Bacteriophages are the most widely spread biological entities in the world. For example, one drop, just one drop of seawater, it contains 10 in 8th degree of different bacteriophages.

If we take a look into our microbiome, that and play a little bit with numbers, so we will get that the human body consists of 10 in 13 fold of eukaryotic cells. The number of bacteria associated with our microbiome is from 3 up to 5 times more. And the number of bacteriophages is 10 times more than the number of bacterial cells.

In other words the number of bacteriophages associated with our microbiota, it’s eventually like 50 times more than human cells.”

Thank you for reading,
Allissa Harter
www.uggleboterapi.se

References
Characteristics of Bacterial Biofilms during Long-Term Culturing
Tetz, G V; Artemenko, N K; Zaslavskaya, N V; Tetz, V V.
Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine; New York Vol. 155, Iss. 4, (Aug 2013): 467-9. DOI:10.1007/s10517-013-2180-7

ABSTRACT:
“The Properties of Biofilms during their long-term existence are poorly understood.”



v8 2019 ltr to Dr. Andrew Carr

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 16:29:07

Copy sent to Dr. Michael Mosley.

Dear Dr. Carr,
I watched Dr Michael Mosley’s Placebo Experiment on Swedish television recently.

https://www.svtplay.se/video/20676588/vetenskapens-varld/vetenskapens-varld-placeboexperimentet?start=auto&tab=2019

@20:17-24:10 surgery of shoulder with common operation of bone removal.

@23:25 Dr Andy Carr says, “We saw no difference between the real operation where we removed the spur and we removed soft tissue and the placebo operation where we simply look inside the joint. The treatment effect, the GAIN for the patient were the same.”

@24:09 – Dr. Carr mentions, if the treatment effect is placebo we probably should not be doing the surgery. We should be trying to understand what happened?

May I tell you about an area of study which is gaining evidence based science research? Fascia. This may hold more of a key as to the HOW your placebo experiment had a positive effect on the “real” and “placebo” shoulder operations.

In 1959, Dr. Leonard Cobb reduced Angina Pectoralis with a sham surgery (1). It was thought at the time, chest pain was reduced by real surgery, ligation of the internal mammary artery. The real surgery was thought to increase coronary artery blood flow; therefore, reducing pain. Dr Cobb proved with his sham surgery, the reduction in pain was NOT due to ligation of the internal mammary artery.

What caused chest pain reduction in his patients? It was called the Placebo Effect.

Is the Placebo Effect accurate? Could Fascia play a role? At the time, the rich sensory organ of fascia was discarded as an inert packing material. Only recently, with new technologies, have the advantages of the this connective tissue coming to the forefront of science.

Thank you,
Allissa

p.s. Sue Hitzmann creator of MELT will be at Manchester Conference Centre March 23-25, 2018 teaching about Fascia.

Resources:

The mysterious world under the skin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWU_DnC9t4I
DW Documentary
Published on Jul 23, 2018

Fifth International Fascia Research Congress, November 14-15, 2018
from Fascia Research Society
https://vimeo.com/ondemand/frc5/303633956

Carla Stecco, MD – Understanding Matrix Biology of Fascia: New Insights
Neil Theise, MD – What Lies Between: Interstitium, Fascia, & Questions of Anatomy and Function (at 0:45:20)

The British Fascia Symposium 2018
Robert Schleip: Fascia as a sensory organ – keynote speaker
Robert Schleip: Fascia and Interoception

1) An Evaluation of Internal-Mammary-Artery Ligation by a Double-Blind Technic
Leonard A. Cobb, M.D.†, George I. Thomas, M.D.‡, David H. Dillard, M.D.§, K. Alvin Merendino, M.D.¶, and Robert A. Bruce, M.D.
N Engl J Med 1959; 260:1115-1118
May 28, 1959 DOI: 10.1056/NEJM195905282602204


Placebo in Surgical Research: A Case-Based Ethical Analysis and Practical Consequences
Biomed Res Int. 2016; 2016: 2627181
Published online 2016 Aug 10. doi: 10.1155/2016/2627181
PMCID: PMC4995345
Sorin Hostiuc, 1 , 2 Irina Rentea, 3 Eduard Drima, 4 , 5 , * and Ionut Negoi 6
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4995345/



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