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British Fascial Symposium 2018

v6 v7 2019 ltr to George Tetz

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 16:20:12

George replied
Monday 11/2-2019 @ kl 13.12 (his time 7:12am on Monday morning)

Dear Allissa,
Thank you for your interest to our project. We will explore your suggestions.
Kindly yours,
George

I emailed letter to George Tetz
Sunday 10/2-2019 @ kl 18.44

Dr. Tetz,
I listened and watched your interview on Empowering Neurologist, episode 77.

I am excited about your research with the phagobiome, auto-immunity and reading some of the numerous publications. I have thought the same way as you but without a research arm, impossible to test.

Keep going!!! The future is exciting.

Just a few thoughts to leave you with.

Please consider something other than the Vagus Nerve as a pathway of the ENS to the brain. The fascia has been researched as a Sensory Organ by the Fascia Research Society. And the Interstitum, by Dr. Neil Theise, is credited for health of tissue. Bud A.D. Craig, a neuroscientist, found a pathway from the body to the Insula instead of the Somatosensory Cortex in the 1990s. I believe most of this information comes from the fascia, but I have no way to prove this thought.

All my best for future endeavours.
Allissa from Iowa, Living in Sweden
www.uggleboterapi.se

Neil Theise
Neil Theise is a professor of Pathology at the NYU School of Medicine in New York, New York

Rebecca Wells
Rebecca Wells is a professor of Medicine and Bioengineering in the Faculty of the Center for Engineering Mechanobiology at UPenn, part of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Bassler Labs working on Quorum Sensing, Fluid Flow and Biofilms.
Bonnie L. Bassler @ Karolinska Institutet “Quorum Sensing and its Control”
Research Lecture at Nobel Forum
Published on Nov 9, 2016
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUgu7Qy8GGA
@42:56 – 43:21 We have this fantastic 3-way inter-Kingdom partnership.

Parkinson’s disease and bacteriophages as its overlooked contributors
George Tetz, Stuart M. Brown, Yuhan Hao & Victor Tetz
Scientific Reports
Published: 17 July 2018
volume 8, Article number: 10812 (2018)
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-29173-4

•The gut bacteria may be implicated in PD through several pathways, including the effects on the enteric nervous system (ENS) which is in constant direct communication with the brain through the vagus nerve14,15

•The model of gut-originating, inflammation-driven PD pathogenesis is based on the idea that alterations in the intestinal bacterial community may play a role in triggering α-synuclein misfolding in the ENS. According to this model, PD starts in the ENS and then spreads in a retrograde manner through the vagus nerve to the central nervous system16,18,19.

•Moreover, changes in the gut microbiota composition may cause alterations in the intestinal barrier function and permeability, affecting both the immune system and ENS, including neurons and glial cells, and exerting a profound effect on the condition of PD patients21,22,23. Increased intestinal permeability is also associated with activation of enteric neurons and enteric glial may contribute to the initiation of alpha-synuclein misfolding17.



v5 2019 ltr to Keith Kowal

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 14:33:02

Friday February 1, 2019
writing letter to Keith Kowal about Fascia-Related Disorders

Dear Keith,
May I tell you about my mom and mTrP?

My mom had pain with her knees when I was in college (1990-1995). I remember in college, I met my sister and my mom at Panera Bread in Des Moines, after my mom’s orthopedic appt. I came up from Simpson College in Indianola, Iowa to have lunch with them.

Panera was one of our favorite places to go for lunch and it was nice to meet up with them. My mom told me, the orthopedist said both knees would need replacements later in her life. At the time, she was too young to have them replaced. If she had surgery then, they may need to be replaced again at a later date. She would have to suffer through the pain of walking and exercise, take pain medication. He told her to come back to see him in 10 years. My mom was in her mid 50s.

A few years later, in 1996, Dr. Charles scoped her left knee. My mom was 56 years old.

Then two years later, in 1998 at 58, Dr. Charles replaced her right hip. Oh boy! Was that a mess!

My sister, at the time, worked for Grinnell General Hospital as a Physician Assistant. Allison was already upset as my mom had woken up during the replacement procedure to see Dr Charles standing on the operating table with a malet in his hand. He was hammering in her hip replacement. My mother told my sister about the mishap – lack of anesthesia – so Allison took the concern up to the head of the hospital.

There was a larger issue to address as well. Upon waking from surgery, my mom had a tremendous amount of pain. She is allergic to morphine, so another pain killer was administered per doctor’s orders. Per doctor’s orders, the pain medication was limited. My mother awoke after a short nap screaming in agony. Dr. Charles did not “believe” in pain killers, the nurses could not help my mother.

Grinnell General Hospital due to this situation had a policy shift regarding patients and administration of pain killers. Way to go sis! Allison won a victory for future patients.

To this day, there is a deep scar along my mom’s right IT-band. There is a series of staple scars perpendicular to a deep line from the outer right knee to the upper right hip. And still today, my mom swears she was put back together wrong.

My mom did not give up on surgeons. In 2000, the podiatrist corrected both her left and right hammer toes. In 2003, her right rotator cuff had surgery due to a fall 20 years earlier which damaged the ball of the humerus; therefore, the deterioration of the joint gave her pain, said the orthopedist. The orthopedist also told my mom the left shoulder needed surgery too, but the right shoulder was worse, so we take the right one first (btw the left never had surgery after the right one was ‘fixed’).

In 2007, my mom had her left knee replaced by a nice Dutch man, Dr. VandeLunde.

In 2009, the right knee especially hurt. Because my mom had developed clinical depression and anxiety, one way she treated the oppressive symptoms was to exercise by walking. Unfortunately walking, even around the block had become extremely painful. We got a brace for her leg from Chladek Orthotic and Prosthetics in Des Moines, Iowa. This helped her hyper valgus right knee track over the foot better; thereby, not as much pain. We had foot orthotics made as well. And all seemed better, not without pain, but much better.

Her doctor prescribed Physical Therapy (PT). So, we went to a former kindergarten student of my mother’s (my mom taught for 32 years). Kim was a PT at Grinnell General Hospital. My mom was not too impressed with Kim’s work, myofascial release. My mom said, “She just puts her hands on me and waits. It is not helping.” So after a few sessions, we found Stacey. Stacey had her own PT clinic not associated with the hospital.

Stacey assured me that TrPs did not exist. This was confusing to me because I was taking classes with Doug Nelson’s NMT Midwest (Neuromuscular Therapy). His classes centered around Trigger Point research and the work of Janet Travell, M.D and David Simons, M.D.

Stacey worked with my mom manually a few times, then they did strengthening exercises. From then on, it was machine based strengthening. Mom liked it. She had control over her body and she could exercise as well. Win-Win. She wanted to get stronger so she did not have pain, so the Senior Bus (no longer drove after the 2008 car accident) dropped her off, then picked her up an hour later. Stacey was strictly hands off, my mom paid a weekly fee to come to her clinic to exercise. My mom was 69 years old.

One can see from Susan’s partial surgery list1, my mother eventually had the right knee replaced at 72 years old in 2012, by Dr. Matthes at Mercy in West Des Moines, Iowa despite all the strengthening.

High frustration, some anger, irritation and curiosity cause me to ask, questions? Could the outcome have been different for my mom all those years ago in the mid 1990s????

Did she have to take Celebrex and Vioxx all those years for pain?
Did taking the pain medication lead to the sleeping pill dependency?
Or did lack of sleep lead to more pain?
Did the Celebrex and Vioxx contribute to her heart disease? Placement of 2 stents helped fix Coronary Artery Disease in March 2005. Then, followed a roller coaster of 10 years of suicidal depressive emotions and anxiety. Yuck!

First of all, the Orthopedic Surgeon(s) should have been familiar with Janet Travell and David Simons work, right? The 1st edition of Volume 1 was published in 1982. Should one of the surgeons my mother saw know, that, muscle trigger points can cause pain and dysfunction? That there was a concept of Point A can cause pain at Point B and Z, even if the points cross a joint or seems to be unrelated? See picture P 399 Chapter 21, Gastrocnemius Muscle, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual. Vol 2.” (2)

The title of the book is: “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual. Vol 1 and Vol 2.” And Dr. Travell was a White House doctor to President John F. Kennedy. President Kennedy suffered from a lot of pain. (3)

Oh. But wait, there is Stacey. A physical therapist in 2009. “Trigger Points do not exist.” UGH!!!

What if we follow some research written about trigger points by Roland U Gautschi in 2012. Frautschi is a Physical Therapist from Switzerland.
(See YouTube in Swiss Pectoralis Major https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtfvBYMwKIM and Subscapularis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNem1PtA1Gw)

Exercise can help someone, really? Someone especially with fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue or ME, if ATP depletes and an energy crisis develops. Would it not be true: exercise causes more of an energy crisis?

Mr. Gautschi writes Chapter 5.7 about myofascial trigger points (mTrP) of the book, “Fascia. The Tensional Network of the Human Body.” Page 234 states, “The pathophysiological changes are like individual mosaic stones that fit together to form a picture. The factors which combine in the formation of mTrPs are summarized in the “energy crisis model” (Travell & Simons 1999, Mense et al. 2001).“ See photo of p 234 & 235 for more. (4)

I do not claim to have answers, but I see a pattern in my mother’s health crisis. One mosaic stone fits into many mosaic stones to form a picture.

It is time to ask questions, so others do not end up at the waterfall’s edge, clinging to a slippery wet rock. Instead of discussions on who is right, who is wrong, can we please find answers?

This requires courage: to step out of line, to be ridiculed, to be silenced. It also requires searching for lost keys, not under the light where one can see, but in the darkness where they are actually lying / hiding / living.

Thank you for reading,
Allissa from Iowa, Living in Sweden

1) Susan’s partial surgery list October 1996 – June 2012

10-96 left knee arthroscopy Dr. Charles Grinnell, IA
4-97 umbical herina repair Dr. Coster Grinnell, IA
1-98 heart cath. Dr. Laughrun Des Moines, IA
2-98 angioplasty Dr.McGaughey Des Moines, IA
3-98 right hip replacement Dr. Charles Grinnell, IA
6-98 colonoscopy- biopsy Dr. Coster Grinnell, IA
6-98 EGD Dr. Coster Grinnell, IA
8-98 hiatel hernia repair Dr. Coster Grinnell, IA
8-98 right carotid endernecetony Dr. Coster Grinnell, IA
3-00 hammer toes on both feet Dr. Pendarvis Grinnell, IA
straightened-toenails removed on 4th and 5th toes of each foot and bone spur under 5th toe on rt. foot removed
8-01 colonoscopy & EGD/duodenal Dr. Coster Grinnell, IA and pyloric ulcer found
12-01 EGD Dr. Coster Grinnell, IA
6-24-03 right shoulder rotator cuff repair Dr. Davick Des Moines, IA
1-24-05 Bilateral inguinal hernia repair Dr. Coster Grinnell, IA mesh needed/veins removed from left leg WARNING: Dramatic bld pressure drop at end of procedure, in ICU afterwards.
3-30-05 Angioplasty rt. Coronary Dr. McGaughey Des Moines, IA 95%&50% blockage –2 stints medicated stints placed in artery/70% descending lateral blockage, left alone
02-07 MRI, brain Donna Sullivan Grinnell, IA
08-07 Electric Shock Therapy Dr. Preston Iowa Lutheran, Des Moines IA
09-07 MRI, brain Donna Sullivan Grinnell, IA
12-07 CT scan – abdominal Donna Sullivan Grinnell, IA
12-07 Chemically Induced Stress Test Dr. McGaughey Des Moines, IA
2-11-07 L Knee Replacement Dr. VandeLunde GRMC hospital, Grinnell, IA
04/28/08 Auto Accident Dr. Sidwell / Swagel Des Moines, IA
5-20-08 CT scan – brain Dr. Carlstrom Des Moines, IA
08-08 Electric Shock Therapy Dr. Preston Iowa Lutheran, Des Moines IA
3/5/09 Diagnosed with low pressure glaucoma Dr. S.J.Kaufman Florida
3/10/09 1st treatment – laser surgery right eye
3/12/09 2nd treatment – laser surgery left eye
5/17/09 ICU, GMRC Dr. Jerry Wehr Grinnell, IA
06-07/09 to Jan 2010 ECT treatment Dr. Mark Preston IA Lutheran Hospital
10 / 12 Umbilical Hernia, outpatient Dr. Coster Grinnell, IA
06/04/12 R knee replacement Dr. Matthes Mercy West Lakes

2 Picture page 399 Chapter 21, Gastrocnemius Muscle, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual. Vol 2.”

3On the day she first met and hospitalized JFK in May 24, 1955…. Dr. Travell made sure that hardly a day went by without JFK doing a little rocking. She also highly encouraged him to swim.

Physical Rehabilitation – Dr. Travell was a marvel at physical rehabilitation measures. She had a keen interest in how shoes, chairs, and braces put stress on back muscles.31 She found that JFK had a left leg about an inch shorter than his right. As a result she made him a heel lift to keep him balanced. She designed special chairs with a writing table attached so he could sit and write without back strain. JFK used a variety of back braces and corsets, which Dr. Travell designed.

Most pain practitioners today use a variety of measures that mimic what a rocking chair or swim can do. The idea is to keep lymph draining and excess electricity moving to reduce pain and promote healing. Included in these measures are massage, vibration, trampoline, walking, aquatic exercises, copper bracelets, and magnets.”

“John F. Kennedy’s Pain Story: From Autoimmune Disease To Centralized Pain” By Forest Tennant, MD, DrPH https://www.practicalpainmanagement.com/pain/myofascial/autoimmune/john-f-kennedys-pain-story-autoimmune-disease-centralized-pain?page=0,4

4
See photo of p 234 & 235 for more. Roland U Gautschi writes Chapter 5.7 about myofascial trigger points (mTrP) of the book, “Fascia: The Tensional Network of the Human Body.”



v10 2019 ltr from Jaap

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 14:14:55

Letter from Jaap to me follows. I went to the Embryo in Motion five day lecture with Jaapy in Stockholm 30 May-3 June 2019. “Jaapy” he called himself this when he would tell stories from his childhood, I find it endearing. NO disrespect is intended for this man. He does not like questions being asked, he has his own thoughts to convey. I learned a lot. BUT, I chickened out discussing my Theory in more detail with his complicated mind. My loss!

sent Monday march 4, 2019
Mr van der Wal,

Thank you very much for the response.

I have contacted the host for the Stockholm event to get more information. It would be a superb lecture for me to hear.

I will see what I can do to clarify the comments I have made. I am gathering information and building more understanding.

The article in Cell, the microbiome changes in a certain period of time 9-10 months.

This is the gestation period for union of a sperm and an egg to develop an embryo. It is within this time period membranes differentiate cells into nerve, bone, blood, etc. Fascia is a membrane. Some fascia is so highly specialized like the dura mater or the pericardium, it is unique to certain structures, perhaps being the scaffolding for stem cells to become glial cells, neurons, or cardiac. The basic layer or building block of an organ originates from a biofilm, a membrane with specialization capabilities. I know this theory has a long way to go, so I will see about coming up to your lecture in Stockholm to listen. Thank you for the information.

All my best,
Allissa

Sunday March 3rd, 2018
Dear Alissa Harter

First of all I would like to apologize for the delay in replying to your email.

Quite unexpected there was a complication in my biography and I needed to spend time to that first.

You write to me from Sweden isn’t it?

In June I will give a course on Embryo in Motion in Stockholm from 30 May till 4 June including a seminar about fascia.

Will you also attend that?

I ask you this because I am more or less embarrassed by your email.

I read your theory over and over again and it’s quite intriguing but I do not get it fully how you connect the three B’s with each other. So if we could be capable of talking and discussing with each other for example during this period in Stockholm, that would make everything far more easier.

I can promise you that I will keep of course all this quite original theories “safe and secret” but in particular I have very large problems in understanding and appreciating the first paragraph (chapter) that begins with “from there was a study in Cell November 2018” till … .”from an egg and a sperm”.

And why you use the term blasphemous that is not become clear to me at all.

It would be wonderful if we could discuss your paper during a meeting.

I am a phenomenologist and phenomenologist’s are very used to make associations and connections where people usually do not make them because it concerns transdisciplinary views and nowadays in science we don’t like transdisciplinary thinking. We always want to live in narrow dead ends of specialists and specialism.

But this time even I cannot follow your associations between bio, biofilm, bone and baby.

I apologize for this.

Thank you for following and appreciating my work as to fascia.

Maybe it’s a good idea to make acquaintance with my embryological phenomenology or phenomenological embryology.

Jaap

Jaap (J.C.) van der Wal MD PhD
Embryo in Beweging / Motion / Bewegung
Sibemaweg 33D
6224 DA Maastricht
The Netherlands – Holland
W. www.embryo.nl
E. jaapvanderwal@embryo.nl
T. + 31 6 55323305

“If we get rid of the life we’ve planned, we can live the life that is waiting for us” (freely from Joseph Campbell).



v5 2019 ltr to Jaap

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, July 12, 2019 14:05:42

This letter is being posted in July 2019 as I have been lax in keeping up on posting in this BLOG. One day someone will find it. Then the Nobel Prize Committee will call me. 🙂

This letter is written the same day #45 is making a State of the Union speech in the USA. UGH!!! And amazingly, Dr. Van der Wal answered, see BLOG v10 2019 ltr from Jaap.

Tisdag den 29/1-2019, kl 9.48
Backaryd Sweden

Dear Dr Van der Wal,
I have followed some of your work regarding the Fascia Congresses as keynote speaker at the 2nd FRC to asking for your autograph at the 5th FRC in Washington D.C. in the book: “Tensional Network of the Human Body,” your chapter 2.2 Proprioception, p81.

Today, I listened to your TEDx Apeldoorn talk from Sept 29, 2017…. about the embryo.

I have a strange idea. I cannot share this with many. It is too blasphemous. Perhaps, I can bend your ear. May I get some advice where to go with the idea, B3 ? Baby, Bone, Biofilm

There was a study in Cell November 2018, “US Immigration Westernizes the Human Gut”. It took 9-10 months for immigrants microbiome to change to the microbiome of their neighbors, about the length of time for gestation.

It is a funny thing that creates a biofilm: delicate workers, yet millions of microbes going to work for 9-10 months can create: cells, tissues, organs, systems = life (human or animal) – all from an egg and a sperm.

Bones of ancient Egyptians have found fermented antibiotic, Tetracycline, nestled inside the bone. Why would a molecule live in teeth and bone if it were anti-life? The bones seen at BodyWorlds in Amsterdam showed me a picture of the spongey trabeculae, where biofilms have hardened to make bone.

Bone needs pressure and stress to develop properly. In the womb, there is pressure in the small space of the placenta, but it is the sensation of touch: the baby walking and crawling, which make the bones & baby develop further.

The placenta is an incubator of an anti-gravity environment yet of pressure & fluid in a compact space. This would allow quorum sensing to occur. Unlike the environment of astronauts, whom have a difficult time with wasting of: muscle, joints, eyes, bone in space. Pressure and FLUID are needed for microbial life as we know it.

Bacteria quorum sense, per Bonnie Bassler at Bassler Labs at Princeton. Quorum Sense (QS) can turn on when bacteria density reaches a quorum. Can QS turn off, if there is too much pressure or not enough fluid, as in cancer?

Bacteria build biofilms. This is their job and they have billions of years practicing their craft.

I hope this message is received in good faith. It is original and I would appreciate it kept between us for now.

Thank you,
Allissa Harter from Iowa, Living in Sweden.

US Immigration Westernizes the Human Gut Microbiome
Pajau Vangay, Abigail J. Johnson, Tonya L. Ward, Purna C. Kashyap, Kathleen A. Culhane-Pera and Dan Knights 13

Published: November 1, 2018
https://www.cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674(18)31382-5.pdf

Highlights
US immigration is associated with loss of gut microbiome diversity
US immigrants lose bacterial enzymes associated with plant fiber degradation
Bacteroides strains displace Prevotella strains according to time spent in the USA
Loss of diversity increases with obesity and is compounded across generations



v4 2019 letter

BFS Lecture Posted on Sun, January 27, 2019 17:14:08

Hi folks,
I wrote last week, week 3 a.k.a Vecka 3, to Microbiologist Lucy Mailing again. She replied and she is very busy. I also wrote to Professor Francis McGlone from Liverpool University.

I did not post these letters. Professor Francis McGlone was on Dr. Rangan Chatterjee’s podcast Jan 19, 2019, and then I watched him on YouTube and Science Friday (2014) discuss the importance of TOUCH.

Professor McGlone wrote back, and I will be contacting folks at Göteberg University as well as researchers at Linköping’s Center for Systems Neurobiology based on his TOUCH research. I think TOUCH is of the utmost importance for neural & physical entrainment, healthy aging and INTEROCEPTION.

Today, I would like to share the letter I wrote to Dr. Ginger Campbell on her amazing episode speaking with Harvard researcher, John Dowling, regarding the brain and vision from her podcast, Brain Science.

Dear Dr. Campbell,
Again, I am humbled and amazed your Brain Science podcast produces such quality. I am one of the curious non-scientists who listen to your show. The information Neuroscientist John Dowling provided in Episode 153 is valuable to me. The Fascia and the Interstitium, I am trying to understand regarding Touch and Healthy Aging. I purchased Dr. Dowling’s book, “Understanding the Brain: From Cells to Behavior to Cognition”. I noticed his papers on Google Scholar, he is referred to as Dowling JE.

Since you have access to Dr. Dowling, can you tell me if he knows of A.D. Bud Craig’s work regarding Interoception traveling to the Insula? As I learned from your show, the Insula is the 1st fold of the brain to form in fetal development. To me, this would be an answer to the “binding problem”. As the Fascia is the Outer Brain, intimately connected to the Inner Brain just like the retina is critical to the inner brain.

I read A.D. Bud Craigs work after your show and attempted his book as well, “How Do You Feel”. No where does Dr. Craig mention Fascia, but it is only recently science is uncovering the potential of collagen’s piezoelectricity, the fluid interstitium (Dr. Neil Theise, Nature, March 2018), and as a sensory system of pain, proprioception and interoception, (Dr. Robert Schleip Ulm Unversity in Germany).

Thank you kindly,
Allissa from Iowa, Living in Sweden

Understanding the Brain with John Dowling (BS 153)
January 25, 2019
http://brainsciencepodcast.com/bsp/

BS 153 is an interview with Harvard neuroscientist John Dowling about his most recent book Understanding the Brain: From Cells to Behavior to Cognition.

Touch – The Forgotten Sense with Professor Francis McGlone
Podcast by Dr. Rangan Chatterjee
January 16, 2019
https://drchatterjee.com/touch-forgotten-sense-professor-francis-mcglone/

Did you know that being touched is essential for healthy brain development? Yet with teachers, healthcare professionals and work colleagues being increasingly hesitant about social touching, for the first time in the evolution of human history, many of us are being exposed to less touch than ever before. But what effect is all this having on our emotional health? World-leading researcher Professor Francis McGlone explains the importance of touch for humans and the devastating consequences of not receiving it. The research in this area is mind-blowing and learning about it has changed the way I interact with my family. I hope you find this conversation useful. I dedicate a chapter of my new book ‘The Stress Solution’ to touch, which is available to order on Amazon now.



v2 last email of the week

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, January 11, 2019 16:21:02

Dear Lucy,
Tuesday, January 8, 2019, I listened to your interview with Chris Kresser RHR: “What the Latest Research Says about Probiotics, with Lucy Mailing” on NOVEMBER 14, 2018.

I have so many questions, alas I know you are busy with your life and other things. If you are interested connecting, please let me know. I have been searching for a microbiologist whom I can speak with about a theory.

Exercise and movement are more beneficial for Parkinson’s patients, not for the known reasons, but a different way of viewing the body. Interoception and Proprioception have to do with fluid flow and sensory transmission within the Organ or System called Fascia aka Interstitum. Currently, the theory I have has not been written about. The story is coming. I hope you can help me.

I live in Sweden. But in your town, Urbana, lives Doug Nelson. A few people at the University know him. Doug is my former educator in massage therapy. He is a scientist of the highest curiosity, an incredibly wonderful man, and someone who encouraged me to do my own research.

Douglas Nelson
President, NMT MidWest
President, Massage Therapy Foundation
www.nmtmidwest.com

Hope we can connect if you so choose.
Thank you.
Allissa from Iowa, Living in Sweden
Read more Blog and British Fascia Symposium (BFS) presentation on my website:
www.uggleboterapi.se
http://uggleboterapi.se/onewebmedia/1b%20presentation%20final.pdf
Or call +46 76 305 9507


Recent information to support this theory is the following.

Dr. Neil Theise – Nature article, “
Structure and Distribution of an Unrecognized Interstitium in Human Tissues” Published: 27 March 2018
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-23062-6?%C2%A0
https://villagezendo.org/events/zen-and-the-discovery-of-a-new-organ-2019/

Zen and the Discovery of a “New” Organ: The Human Interstitium

Neil Soten Theise, MD, physician-scientist and Village Zendo Senior Student will discuss the discovery of a “new” organ widely reported in the world press earlier this year. In telling the story of this new anatomy, he will once again show how zen practice of “not knowing” is at the core of creative scientific advances. Interestingly, the human interstitium —literally the tissue that lies “in between” — may turn out to be the interstitial concept that can finally mediate connections between diverse traditions of clinical practice and biology including contemporary allopathic (“Western”) medicine, osteopathy, fascia science, acupuncture, concepts of chi and prana and pulse diagnosis in Tibetan medicine.

Zen and the Discovery of a “New” Organ, 2019
January 18th, 2019 7pm-9pm
588 Broadway
Suite 1108
New York, NY 10012
Contact: registrar@villagezendo.org

Gil Hedley – Integral Anatomy – YouTube
Fascia is all around us! (for 2018 Fascia Congress, Berlin)
Published on Nov 19, 2018
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=r0uQYBQoBcc

Gil Hedley answers a long standing question: is “the fuzz” fascia? First he shows how subcutaneous adipose, and then loose connective tissue, both can be demonstrated as fascia properly speaking by the strict definition proposed at the 2015 Fascia Congress. Superficial fascia and perifascia are proposed as names for these tissues generally considered to be loose areolar connective tissues.

More info on Gil’s schedule, online courses and free-to-watch integral anatomy videos at www.gilhedley.com



v2 Friday January 11, 2019

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, January 11, 2019 16:05:20

Karissa Sanbonmatsu · Structural biologist
Karissa Sanbonmatsu investigates how DNA allows cells in our body to remember events that take place.
TEDWomen 2018 | November 2018
https://www.ted.com/talks/karissa_sanbonmatsu_the_biology_of_gender_from_dna_to_the_brain?language=en

How exactly does gender work? It’s not just about our chromosomes, says biologist Karissa Sanbonmatsu. In a visionary talk, she shares new discoveries from epigenetics, the emerging study of how DNA activity can permanently change based on social factors like trauma or diet. Learn how life experiences shape the way genes are expressed — and what that means for our understanding of gender.

Ms. Sanbonamatsu and Team
https://www.lanl.gov/projects/karissa/

Letter to Ms. Sanbonamatsu and Team
Friday 11-january-2019

Dear Karissa and Team,
I have no formal science training like your Team, but I have a lot of curiosity which I get from my father’s X chromosome.

I would like to ask your help to figure something out. If you are interested in further discussions after reading this, the opportunity would delight me.

Theory of Fascia and what lives in it: Interoception and proprioception transmission occurs thru fascia, resulting brain health or disease.
by Allissa Harter

I have no formal science training, but I have a lot of curiosity which I get from my father’s X chromosome. Ms. Mailing, I would like to ask your help to figure something out. If you are interested in further discussions after reading this, the opportunity would delight me.

Egyptian Beer Bread contained a molecule well know to modern medicine as a mold, an antibiotic, tetracycline.

Bones of mummies were a hot commodity at one time. The bones were ground up; used by painters as Mummy Brown or by people who drank nasty tasting bone tea. Egyptians who drank the elixir of life, beer bread, or those whom drank bone tea were said to feel overall better.

They consumed an antibiotic which most likely cured common ailments of the day. Scottish chemist Sir Alexander Fleming reintroduced modern medicine to antibiotics as recently as 1928.

Questions:
Why was a molecule like tetracycline found in Ancient Egyptians’ bones and teeth? Why would a molecule lodge in dense connective tissue if it did NOT have a purpose to be there? Would this indicate the molecule was doing its job? Is the protein matrix of the human body collagen, elastin and reticulin, a sort of biofilm built by Quorum Sensing nanosized Bacteria?

This leads me down a rabbit hole with a possible answer.

Soft tissue like fascia and muscles deteriorate over time. Left over is dense connective tissue, bone and teeth. A chronicle of time demonstrating the builders of connective tissue known as bacteria or microbes. The antibiotic found in ancient Egyptian bones must have been there for a reason. This molecule was drawn to naturally occurring bacteria/microbes in the connective tissue.

According to Professor Bonnie Bassler of Princeton’s Bassler Labs. Bacteria build biofilms and bacteria communicate thru Quorum Sensing.

Proteins like Collagen/Elastin/Reticulin and the watery fluid they live in ARE our body’s organ of Interception and Proprioception. This organ would be the Fascia and the ExtraCellularMatrix in which fascia lives. Unlike the vagus nerve, fascia cannot be severed, the network is everywhere, surrounding everything.

The fluid fascia matrix can become dehydrated which will slow or impede transmission to the rest of the network, the brain. (See Neuroanatomist A.D. “Bud” Craig work on Interoception to the brain’s Insula, book: “How Do You Feel”).

Like car batteries of the 1980s, batteries drained and electrolytes could not flow. As signal transmissions impede, the constant ebb and flow of fluid withers, and debris cannot wash away, see Glymphatics. Therefore, tau tangles, hardening & protein build up, cognitive issues, and perception alterations from the norm occur in local or global locations of the body.

This would be an answer to why: Bodywork, Mindfulness, and Relaxation is good for an individual.

Thank you for reading,
Allissa from Iowa, Living in Sweden



v2 Friday January 11, 2019

BFS Lecture Posted on Fri, January 11, 2019 15:55:40

Email campaign – week 2


Doug,
In case you are on U of I campus and you run into a woman named Lucy Mailing. Could you put this theory in your pocket and hand it to her?

Lucy is a fourth-year graduate student in the dual degree MD/PhD program at the University of Illinois
and was recently recognized by the American Society of Nutrition as an Emerging Leader in Nutrition Sciences. Her dissertation research focuses on the effects of diet and exercise on the gut microbiome and how this impacts gut and skin health.

Lucy is accomplished researcher and writer:

• “Are Probiotics Useless? A Microbiome Researcher’s Perspective,” by Lucy Mailing

• “Personalized Gut Mucosal Colonization Resistance to Empiric Probiotics Is Associated with Unique Host and Microbiome Features,” published in Cell

• “Post-Antibiotic Gut Mucosal Microbiome Reconstitution Is Impaired by Probiotics and Improved by Autologous FMT,” published in Cell

• website: NextGen Medicine lucy@ngmedicine.com

Theory of Fascia and what lives in it: Interoception and proprioception transmission occurs thru fascia, resulting brain health or disease.

by Allissa Harter

I have no formal science training, but I have a lot of curiosity which I get from my father’s X chromosome. Ms. Mailing, I would like to ask your help to figure something out. If you are interested in further discussions after reading this, the opportunity would delight me.

Egyptian Beer Bread contained a molecule well know to modern medicine as a mold, an antibiotic, tetracycline.

Bones of mummies were a hot commodity at one time. The bones were ground up; used by painters as Mummy Brown or by people who drank nasty tasting bone tea. Egyptians who drank the elixir of life, beer bread, or those whom drank bone tea were said to feel overall better.

They consumed an antibiotic which most likely cured common ailments of the day. Scottish chemist Sir Alexander Fleming reintroduced modern medicine to antibiotics as recently as 1928.

Questions:
Why was a molecule like tetracycline found in Ancient Egyptians’ bones and teeth? Why would a molecule lodge in dense connective tissue if it did NOT have a purpose to be there? Would this indicate the molecule was doing its job? Is the protein matrix of the human body collagen, elastin and reticulin, a sort of biofilm built by Quorum Sensing nanosized Bacteria?

This leads me down a rabbit hole with a possible answer.

Soft tissue like fascia and muscles deteriorate over time. Left over is dense connective tissue, bone and teeth. A chronicle of time demonstrating the builders of connective tissue known as bacteria or microbes. The antibiotic found in ancient Egyptian bones must have been there for a reason. This molecule was drawn to naturally occurring bacteria/microbes in the connective tissue.

According to Professor Bonnie Bassler of Princeton’s Bassler Labs. Bacteria build biofilms and bacteria communicate thru Quorum Sensing.

Proteins like Collagen/Elastin/Reticulin and the watery fluid they live in ARE our body’s organ of Interception and Proprioception. This organ would be the Fascia and the ExtraCellularMatrix in which fascia lives. Unlike the vagus nerve, fascia cannot be severed, the network is everywhere, surrounding everything.

The fluid fascia matrix can become dehydrated which will slow or impede transmission to the rest of the network, the brain. (See Neuroanatomist A.D. “Bud” Craig work on Interoception to the brain’s Insula, book: “How Do You Feel”).

Like car batteries of the 1980s, batteries drained and electrolytes could not flow. As signal transmissions impede, the constant ebb and flow of fluid withers, and debris cannot wash away, see Glymphatics. Therefore, tau tangles, hardening & protein build up, cognitive issues, and perception alterations from the norm occur in local or global locations of the body.

This would be an answer to why: Bodywork, Mindfulness, and Relaxation is good for an individual.

Thank you for reading,
Allissa from Iowa, Living in Sweden

Read more Blog and British Fascia Symposium (BFS) presentation on my website:
www.uggleboterapi.se
http://uggleboterapi.se/onewebmedia/1b%20presentation%20final.pdf



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